I hear this word used a lot.  You hear many people speak of the “shekinah glory”, often in ignorant “parroting” of something they heard somewhere.

The word “shakan” which means abiding, dwelling, or habitation is in the hebrew text 128 times (Strong’s 7931).

The hebrew word “shekinah” is not in the Hebrew biblical text and is a “feminine” form.

It is found in rabbinic literature and comes from the jewish mystical tradition, or kabbalah (a form of Babylonian mystery religion) and in this religion shekinah refers to the “divine feminine” or a feminine aspect of God.

The traditions of men is what Jesus rebuked the elders of Israel for in Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-4, Luke 11:37-41

The heretical concept of the “divine feminine” is a common theme in most esoteric traditions and can be traced back to the Osiris, Semiramis, and Tammuz mythos.

Note how it has influenced these famous paintings where we see the “red headed girlfriend of God” making an appearance…

Whereas the verb shakan and terms from the root (shkn) occur in the Hebrew Scriptures, and while the term shekinah/shekinta is extremely common in rabbinic literature and the targums, no occurrence of it is attested in pre-rabbinic literature.
McNamara, Martin (2010). McNamara, Martin, ed. argum and Testament Revisited: Aramaic Paraphrases of the Hebrew Bible: A Light on the New Testament (Second ed.). Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing. ISBN 9780802862754.

The term “shekhinah” is not found in the Bible, and it was formulated in talmudic literature from the biblical verb designating the residence (shkn) of God in the temple in Jerusalem and among the Jewish people. “Shekhinah” is used in rabbinic literature as one of the many abstract titles or references to God.
Dan, Joseph (2006). Kabbalah: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press. p. 46. ISBN 9780195300345.

See also
Dictionary of Comparative Religion (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons 1970), p. 573: “Shekinah”.

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